Publications 2019

Publications 2019

Publications 2019 de l'UMR BOA

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Conde-Aguilera, J. A. ; Lefaucheur, L. ; Gondret, F. ; Delgado-Andrade, C. ; Mercier, Y. ; Tesseraud, S. ; van Milgen, J.European Journal of Nutrition, 2019, sous presse (sous presse) : sous presse. ArticlePurpose A total sulfur amino acid (TSAA) deficient diet can affect the amino acid composition of skeletal muscles. However, it is unknown how the different muscle proteins are affected by the TSAA deficiency. Methods The proteomic profiles of the fast-twitch glycolytic longissimus (LM) and the slow-twitch oxidative rhomboideus (RM) muscles were compared in 42-day-old piglets fed either a 28% deficient (TSAA-) or a sufficient (TSAA+) diet in TSAA for 10 days. Differentially regulated proteins were identified and submitted to Gene Ontology Pathways Analysis to identify biological processes affected by TSAA deficiency. Results A total of 36 proteins in LM and 24 proteins in RM differed in abundance between the two dietary treatments. In both muscles, an increased oxidative energy metabolism was observed in TSAA- piglets. However, a greater mitochondrial oxidation of pyruvate generated from glycolysis was observed in LM of TSAA- piglets, whereas fatty acid beta-oxidation and glycogen sparing were favored in RM. This suggests a muscle-specific reorientation of energy metabolism in response to a TSAA- deficiency. In both muscles, the protein abundance and enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase were increased in TSAA- piglets. Other enzymes involved in antioxidant defense, heat shock proteins coping with cellular stress, and annexins involved in the regulation of apoptosis were generally found to be more expressed in the LM of TSAA- piglets, with no or minor changes in RM. Conclusions Skeletal muscle proteome in young growing piglets was modulated in a muscle-dependent manner by a deficient TSAA supply, with accentuated changes in fast-twitch glycolytic muscle.
Peyraud, J.-L. ; Aubin, J. ; Barbier, M. ; Baumont, R. ; Berri, C. ; Bidanel, J. P. ; Citti, C. ; Cotinot, C. ; Ducrot, C. ; Dupraz, P. ; Faverdin, P. ; Friggens, N. ; Houot, S. ; Nozières-Petit, M.-O. ; Rogel-Gaillard, C. ; Sante-Lhoutellier, V.INRA Productions Animales, 2019, 32 (2) : 323-338. Article
Jehl, F. ; Désert, C. ; Klopp, C. ; Brenet, M. ; Rau, A. ; Leroux, S. ; Boutin, M. ; Lagoutte, L. ; Muret, K. ; Blum, Y. ; Esquerré, D. ; Gourichon, D. ; Burlot, T. ; Collin, A. ; Pitel, F. ; Benani, A. ; Zerjal, T. ; Lagarrigue, S.BMC Genomics, 2019, 20 (1) : 1033. ArticlePièces jointes : 2019_jehl_bmg_genomics.pdfBackground: Production conditions of layer chicken can vary in terms of temperature or diet energy content compared to the controlled environment where pure-bred selection is undertaken. The aim of this study was to better understand the long-term effects of a 15%-energy depleted diet on egg-production, energy homeostasis and metabolism via a multi-tissue transcriptomic analysis. Study was designed to compare effects of the nutritional intervention in two layer chicken lines divergently selected for residual feed intake. Results: Chicken adapted to the diet in terms of production by significantly increasing their feed intake and decreasing their body weight and body fat composition, while their egg production was unchanged. No significant interaction was observed between diet and line for the production traits. The low energy diet had no effect on adipose tissue and liver transcriptomes. By contrast, the nutritional challenge affected the blood transcriptome and, more severely, the hypothalamus transcriptome which displayed 2700 differentially expressed genes. In this tissue, the low-energy diet lead to an over-expression of genes related to endocannabinoid signaling (CN1R, NAPE-PLD) and to the complement system, a part of the immune system, both known to regulate feed intake. Both mechanisms are associated to genes related polyunsaturated fatty acids synthesis (FADS1, ELOVL5 and FADS2), like the arachidonic acid, a precursor of anandamide, a key endocannabinoid, and of prostaglandins, that mediate the regulatory effects of the complement system. A possible regulatory role of NR1H3 (alias LXRα) has been associated to these transcriptional changes. The low-energy diet further affected brain plasticity-related genes involved in the cholesterol synthesis and in the synaptic activity, revealing a link between nutrition and brain plasticity. It upregulated genes related to protein synthesis, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid oxidation in the hypothalamus, suggesting reorganization in nutrient utilization and biological synthesis in this brain area. Conclusions: We observed a complex transcriptome modulation in the hypothalamus of chicken in response to low-energy diet suggesting numerous changes in synaptic plasticity, endocannabinoid regulation, neurotransmission, lipid metabolism, mitochondrial activity and protein synthesis. This global transcriptomic reprogramming could explain the adaptive behavioral response (i.e. increase of feed intake) of the animals to the low-energy content of the diet.
Travel, A. ; Metayer, J.-P. ; Mika, A. ; Bailly, J.-D. ; Cleva, D. ; Boissieu ; Le Guennec, J. ; Albaric, O. ; Labrut ; Lepivert, G. ; Marengue ; Froment, P. ; Tardieu, D. ; GuerreAvian Diseases, 2019, 63 (4) : 703-712. ArticleSurveys of mycotoxins worldwide have shown that deoxynivalenol (DON), fumonisins (FB), and zearalenone (ZON) are the most abundant Fusarium mycotoxins (FUS) in European poultry feed, in both the level and the frequency of contamination. Previous studies reported that a combination of FUS at concentrations that individually are not toxic may negatively affect animals. However, although toxic thresholds and regulatory guidelines exist for FUS, none account for the risk of multiple contamination, which is the most frequent. The aim of this study was to compare DON, FB, and ZON toxicity, alone and in combination, in male turkey poults. Ground cultured toxigenic Fusarium strains were incorporated in corn-soybean-based feed in five experimental diets: control diet, containing no mycotoxins, DON diet (5 mg DON/kg), FB diet (20 mg FB1 + FB2/ kg), ZON diet (0.5 mg ZON/kg), and DONFBZON diet (5, 20, and 0.5 mg/kg of DON, FB1 + FB2, and ZON, respectively). Seventy male Grade Maker turkeys were reared in individual cages on mycotoxin-free diets from 0 to 55 days of age. On the 55th day, the turkeys were weighed and divided into five groups each comprising 14 birds. Each group was fed one of the five experimental diets for a period of 14 days. On the 70th day of age, feed was withheld for 8 hr, at which time a blood sample was collected, and then all the turkeys were killed, autopsied, and different tissues sampled. The weight of the different organs, analyses of performance, biochemistry, histopathology, oxidative damage, and testis toxicity revealed no significant effects attributable to FUS. Measurement of sphingolipids in the liver revealed an increase in the sphinganine to sphingosine ratio in turkeys fed diets containing FB, but had no apparent consequences in terms of toxicity. Finally, only slight differences were found in some variables and the results of this study showed no interactions between DON, FB, and ZON. Taken together, results thus suggest that the maximum tolerated levels established for individual contamination by DON, FB, and ZON can also be considered safe in turkeys fed with combinations of these FUS for a period of 14 days.
Massimino, W. ; Davail, S. ; Bernadet, M.-D. ; Pioche, T. ; Tavernier, A. ; Ricaud, K. ; Gontier, K. ; Bonnefont, C. ; Manse, H. ; Morisson, M. ; Fauconneau, B. ; Collin, A. ; Panserat, S. ; Houssier, M.Frontiers in Physiology, 2019, 10ArticlePièces jointes : 2019_Massimino_FrontiersPhysiol.pdfAnimal studies have shown that very early life events may have programing effects on adult metabolism and health. In this study, we aim, for the first, time to elucidate the effects of embryonic thermal manipulation (TM) on the performance of overfed mule ducks, in particular for the production of foie gras (fatty liver). We designed three embryonic TMs with different protocols for increasing the incubation temperature during the second part of embryogenesis, to determine whether hepatic metabolism could be “programed” to improve its fattening response to overfeeding at the age of three months. Initial results confirm that an increase in the incubation temperature leads to faster development (observed for all treated groups compared to the control group), and a decrease in the body surface temperature at birth. Thereafter, in a very innovative way, we showed that the three TM conditions specifically increased liver weights, as well as liver lipid content after overfeeding compared to the non-TM control group. These results demonstrate that embryonic TM effectively “programs” the metabolic response to the challenge of force-feeding, resulting in increased hepatic steatosis. Finally, our goal of improving foie gras production has been achieved with three different embryonic thermal stimuli, demonstrating the high reproducibility of the method. However, this repeatability was also perceptible in the adverse effects observed on two groups treated with exactly the same cumulative temperature rise leading to a reduction in hatchability (75 and 76% vs. 82% in control), in addition to an increase in the melting rate after cooking. These results suggest that embryonic thermal programing could be an innovative and inexpensive technique for improving foie gras production, although the specific protocol (duration, level or period of temperature increase), remains to be elucidated in order to avoid adverse effects
Pitel, F. ; Calenge, F. ; Aigueperse, N. ; Estelle Fabrellas, J. ; Coustham, V. ; Calandreau, L. ; Morisson, M. ; Chavatte-Palmer, P. ; Ginane, C.INRA Productions Animales, 2019, 32 (2) : 247-262. ArticleLes animaux d’élevage sont confrontés à de multiples contraintes environnementales auxquelles ils doivent s’adapter. De plus en plus d’études s’intéressent à l’impact de l’environnement précoce sur les phénotypes des animaux et leurs capacités à s’adapter aux différents challenges rencontrés ultérieurement. Dans cette revue, nous nous intéressons aux connaissances actuelles sur l’influence de l’environnement précoce sur la construction et la variabilité des phénotypes et de l’adaptation des animaux d’élevage à leur milieu, en prenant des exemples dans différentes espèces. Nous nous focalisons sur les rôles de trois contributeurs importants de la construction des phénotypes : les mécanismes épigénétiques, le microbiote et les processus comportementaux. Les mécanismes épigénétiques, qui modulent l’expression du génome sous l’effet de perturbations environnementales intervenues pendant le développement, peuvent induire une variété de phénotypes dont les caractéristiques peuvent perdurer jusqu’à l’âge adulte, voire se transmettre à la génération suivante. La constitution du microbiote digestif est elle aussi très dépendante de l’environnement précoce, et joue un rôle important dans l’expression des phénotypes, notamment dans le domaine de la santé. Enfin, l’expérience précoce influence considérablement le comportement de l’animal, en particulier ses capacités d’apprentissage, qui peuvent lui conférer une meilleure adaptation à des situations nouvelles ultérieures. Les études menées dans ces domaines permettent de définir de nouveaux leviers d’action pour tenter d’optimiser les capacités d’adaptation de nos animaux, notamment par les voies de l’alimentation des animaux jeunes ou de leurs parents voire de leurs grands-parents, de l’acclimatation pendant le développement, ou plus généralement par des modifications de l’environnement, en particulier de l’environnement social.
Dumont, B. ; Dupraz, P. ; Donnars, C. ; Aubin, J. ; Benoit, M. ; Bouamra, Z. ; Chatellier, V. ; Delaby, L. ; Delfosse, C. ; Dourmad, J.-Y. ; Duru, M. ; Friant-Perrot, M. ; Gaigné, C. ; Guichet, J.-L. ; Havlík, P. ; Hostiou, N. ; Huguenin-Elie, O. ; Klumpp, K. ; Langlais, A. ; Lavenant, S. ; Méda, B. ; LEPILLER, O. ; Ryschawy, J. ; Sabatier, R. ; Veissier, I. ; Verrier, E. ; Vollet, D.Versailles (FRA) : Quae éditions (Matière à Débattre et Décider), 2019. 191 p. OuvragePièces jointes : Impacts et services issus des élevages européens.pdfDepuis le milieu des années 2000, l’élevage fait l’objet de vifs débats en raison de ses impacts sur le climat et l’environnement, accentués par la hausse de la consommation mondiale en viandes et produits laitiers. Les impacts et services issus des élevages sont ici étudiés à l’échelle de l’Europe, en examinant leurs effets sur les marchés, l’emploi et le travail, la consommation d’intrants, l’environnement et le climat, ainsi que les enjeux sociaux et culturels associés à l’élevage. Puis les interactions entre ces volets ou « bouquets de services » sont analysées simultanément. Ces bouquets sont déclinés dans une typologie et cartographiés selon six classes de territoires d’élevage européens à partir de deux critères : la densité en animaux et la part de prairies permanentes dans le paysage agricole. Cet ouvrage reprend les enseignements d’une expertise scientifique collective conduite par 26 experts de disciplines scientifiques complémentaires et coordonnée par l’Inra, réalisée à la demande conjointe des ministères en charge de l’Environnement et de l’Agriculture, et de l’Ademe.
Stapane, L. ; Le Roy, N. ; Hincke, M. T. ; Gautron, J.Journal of Biological Chemistry, 2019, 294 (40) : 14526-14545. ArticlePièces jointes : Article EDIL3
Gloux, A. ; Le Roy, N. ; Brionne, A. ; BONIN, E. ; Juanchich, A. ; Benzoni, G. ; Piketty, M.-L. ; Prié ; Nys, Y. ; Gautron, J. ; Narcy, A. ; Duclos, M. J.Poultry Science, 2019, 98 (11) : 6005-6018. Article
Le Roy, N. ; Combes-Soia, L. ; Brionne, A. ; Labas, V. ; Rodriguez-Navarro, A. B. ; Hincke, M. T. ; Nys, Y. ; Gautron, J.Journal of Proteomics, 2019, 209ArticleThe Guinea fowl eggshell is a bioceramic material with the remarkable mechanical property of being twice as strong as the chicken eggshell. Both eggshells are composed of 95% calcite and 3.5% organic matrix, which control its structural organization. Chicken eggshell is made of columnar calcite crystals arranged vertically. In the Guinea fowl, the same structure is observed in its inner half, followed by a dramatic change in crystal size and orientation in the outer region. Guinea fowl eggshell is thicker than chicken eggshell. Both structure and shell thickness confer a superior resistance to breakage compared to eggshells of other bird species. To understand the underlying mechanisms controlling the structural organization of this highly resistant material, we used quantitative proteomics to analyze the protein composition of the Guinea fowl eggshell organic matrix at key stages of the biomineralization process. We identified 149 proteins, which were compared to other bird eggshell proteomes and analyzed their potential functions. Among the 149 proteins, 9 are unique to Guinea fowl, some are involved in the control of the calcite precipitation (Lysozyme, Ovocleidin-17-like, Ovocleidin-116 and Ovalbumin), 61 are only found in the zone of microstructure shift and 17 are more abundant in this zone. Significance: The avian eggshell is a critical physical barrier to protect the contents of this autonomous reproductive enclosure from physical and microbial assault. The Guinea fowl (Numida meleagris) eggshell exhibits a unique microstructure (texture), which confers exceptional mechanical properties compared to eggshells of other species. In order to understand the mechanisms that regulate formation of this texture in the Guinea fowl eggshell, we performed comparative quantitative proteomics at key stages of shell mineralization and particularly during the dramatic shift in shell microstructure. We demonstrate that the Guinea fowl eggshell proteome comprises 149 proteins, of which 61 were specifically associated with the change in size and orientation of calcite crystals. Comparative proteomics analysis with eggshell of other bird species leads to new insights into the biomineralization process. Moreover, our data represents a list of organic compounds as potential additives to regulate material design for industrial fabrication of ceramics. This information also provides molecular markers for efficient genomic selection of chicken strains to lay eggs with improved shell mechanical properties for enhanced food safety.

Date de modification : 01 août 2023 | Date de création : 13 mars 2019 | Rédaction : O. Bertel